Hi there mlr99,


From what you describe it sounds like you are trying to install Lion on your newly installed HDD replacement but its not showing as a disk when you try to actually install Mac OS X. That indicates to me that the drive has not yet been formatted as Mac OS Extended Journaled, so it is not ready for Lion to install onto it. This section of the following article will help you get that drive erased and formatted properly so you can continue with the installation:


  1. Before you begin, make sure your Mac is connected to the Internet.
  2. Restart your Mac. Immediately hold down the Command (⌘) and R keys after you hear the startup sound to start up in OS X Recovery.
  3. When the Recovery window appears, select Disk Utility then click Continue.
  4. Select the indented volume name of your startup disk from the left side of the Disk Utility window, then click the Erase tab.
  5. If you want to securely erase the drive, click Security Options. Select an erase method, then click OK.
  6. From the Format pop-up menu, select Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Type a name for your disk, then click Erase.
  7. After the drive is erased, close the Disk Utility window.
  8. If you’re not connected to the Internet, choose a network from the Wi-Fi menu.
  9. Select the option to Reinstall OS X.
  10. Click Continue and follow the onscreen instructions to reinstall OS X.
  1. Disk Inventory X is a disk usage utility for Mac OS X. It shows the sizes of files and folders in a special graphical way called 'treemaps'. If you've ever wondered where all your disk space has gone, Disk Inventory X will help you to answer this question. For a quick start please read the readme file on the disk.
  2. If OS X isn’t booting completely or is locking up, you can’t launch Disk Utility. To repair your boot hard drive if OS X isn’t running, you need to boot your Mac from El Capitan’s Recovery HD volume. Hold down the Option key immediately after you hear the start up chord to display the Mac OS X boot menu, and choose the Recovery HD volume.
  3. OS X Disk Utility Terminal Hard Drive The Disk Utility application is a powerful tool for keeping the drives that are connected to your Mac happy and healthy. But there are situations in.
  4. Clear disk space on Mac with CleanMyMac X. CleanMyMac is the go-to disk space analyzer for over.

Or, you can boot your system from the original Mac OS X installation CD and run Disk Utility from the Installation menu. Your start-up disk is automatically verified and repaired (if necessary) during the boot procedure, so you really don’t need to worry about checking the start-up disk.


Thank you for using Apple Support Communities.

By default, your Mac starts up from its built-in hard disk, but a startup disk can be any storage device that contains an operating system compatible with your Mac. For example, if you install macOS on an internal or external drive, your Mac can recognize that drive as a startup disk. You can then follow the steps in this article to start up from it.

Use Startup Disk preferences

When you use Startup Disk preferences to select a startup disk, your Mac starts up from that disk until you choose a different one.

  1. Choose Apple menu  > System Preferences, then click Startup Disk.
  2. Click the lock and enter your administrator password.
  3. Select your startup disk, then restart your Mac.

If you see a message that your security settings do not allow this Mac to use an external startup disk, check the External Boot setting in Startup Security Utility.

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Use Startup Manager

When you use Startup Manager to select a startup disk, your Mac starts up from that disk once, then returns to using the disk selected in Startup Disk preferences.

  1. Press and hold the Option (Alt) key immediately after turning on or restarting your Mac.
  2. Release the Option key when you see the Startup Manager window.
    If your Mac is protected by a firmware password, you can release the key when you're asked to enter the password.
  3. Select your startup disk, then click the arrow under its icon, or press Return.
    If you press and hold the Control key during this step, your selection is saved in Startup Disk preferences, so it persists until you change it.

If your Mac is using OS X Lion 10.7.3 or later, you can also use this method to start up from your Time Machine backup disk. Startup Manager identifies your Time Machine backup as ”EFI Boot.”

If you can't select your startup disk or start up from it

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Check for these possibilities if you can't see your disk in Startup Disk preferences or Startup Manager, or your Mac won't start up from it.

Check for a compatible operating system on the startup disk

Make sure that your startup disk is using a version of macOS that is compatible with your Mac. If in doubt, use the same Mac to reinstall macOS on that disk.

To start up from an external disk with macOS Catalina 10.15 or later, the disk must connect via USB-A, USB-C, or Thunderbolt, not FireWire.

Check startup security settings

If you're using a Mac that has the Apple T2 Security Chip, check the settings in Startup Security Utility. These settings determine whether your Mac can start up from another disk.

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Check for Option ROM firmware

If you're in Startup Manager and can't see a third-party startup disk, the startup disk could be using Option ROM firmware. To enhance system security, Mac computers with up-to-date software don’t show devices that use Option ROM firmware until you load their firmware. To do that, press Option-Shift-Command-Period while in Startup Manager. If your startup disk appears, do that each time you want to start up from it or from another disk connected to it.

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If you're using a firmware password, the ability to load Option ROM firmware is disabled as an additional security protection.

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